.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

Great Falls Reporter

  • Former mayor gives original art to town

    James Baker served the Town of Great Falls as mayor for eight years, from 1986-1994.

    He gave his knowledge, time, skills and professionalism.

    Now 24 years later, Baker is giving another gift to the town.

    Baker and his wife Barbara had an original piece of artwork painted by the late Elizabeth Abernathy, a former town councilwoman and wife of the late Town Attorney Harry Abernathy, hanging in the office of their home on Ross Dye Road.

    Abernathy painted the Great Falls town seal and presented it to Baker during his tenor as mayor.

  • Phone scam targets residents and officers

    The Fairfield County Sheriff’s Office is warning residents to be wary of recent telephone scams.

    The most recent trend involves the caller stating that the “Fairfield County Civil Process” has warrants on the intended victim and the intended victim needs to make arrangements to pay to “do away” with the warrants.

  • Garris will share her skills as artist-in-residence

    Traditional artist Beckee Garris will appear at USC Lancaster’s Native American Studies Center as artist-in-residence through December, demonstrating pottery and basket making techniques and sharing Catawba oral histories and traditions. 

    A member of the Catawba Indian Nation, Garris will alternate weekends making pottery and two different types of basket forms from reeds and long leaf pine needles. Garris, who was first introduced to pottery making by her grandmother, says her art forms are inspired by her ancestors. 

  • Parents, preachers and teachers pray around the pole

    Prayers for students, teachers and administrators sounded around the flagpoles at all three schools in Great Falls around 5 p.m. Sunday evening.

    About 40 people including students, parents, grandparents, ministers and others who just wanted to join in prayer gathered at the schools to join in a prayer of faith.

    The music teacher at Great Falls Elementary School joined in the time of prayer.

    “I think it’s wonderful,” music teacher Eric Green said.

  • Long celebrated as the ‘spark’ of Axis 1 achievements

    BY PUBLISHER LAURA J. MCKENZIE

    The People-Sentinel

    BARNWELL –  Cheryl Azouri Perry Long created the spark which would become Axis 1 44 years ago and fanned the flame which became a guiding light for those impacted by alcoholism, drug addiction, hunger, poverty, sexual issues and abuse.

  • Team wins 'Top Fundraiser Award'
  • Emergency services building hope
  • Prepare for ‘Thrifting in the Falls’

    Great Falls is getting a thrift store.

    And if all goes as planned, the store will be open to customers in the fall.

    The GRASP Thrift Shop is part of the vision the GRASP board of directors has for the future of the community service project.

    GRASP Volunteer Jennifer Shelton will serve as the thrift store manager. In March, Shelton and husband Lonnie Shelton began working on the buildings GRASP purchased in late 2017.

    GRASP owns three buildings, a lean-to and a lot at 601, 602, 603 and 604 Dearborn St.

  • A roof, a floor and a smiling senior

    Christine McManus is accustomed to welcoming guests to her Wildwood Road home. She has housed a young teenage boy who had nowhere to go and once opened her spare bedroom so a newly married couple could stay with her.

    McManus, 96, exemplifies Southern hospitality and a caring, compassionate Christian heart.

    The Bible, in Galatians 6:7-9 says “whatsoever a man soweth, that shallhe also reap.”

    McManus is now reaping rewards for the good deeds she has done for others.

  • Where there is water, people will come

    Put on your old clothes, grab a paintbrush and ladder and get ready to make a difference.

    Your time and skills are needed.

    The Great Falls Home Town Association is looking for volunteers to help spruce up the downtown area.

    “We’re trying to get prepared for tourists coming here and they are going to come whether we’re prepared or not,” GFHTA Executive Director Glinda Coleman said.

    “And we want them to come,” GFHTA Board Chairman Mike Vaughn added.