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Government

  • City Council discusses budget, building repair

    Chester City Council engaged in some brief budgetary discussions during a recent regularly scheduled meeting that featured a very light agenda.
    City Administrator Jeff Kerr told the council that the state's ways and means committee had informed him that it's yearly allocation to municipalities was being cut by about 20 percent. He said that would make an already tight budget that much tighter.
    "That will be about $33,000 out of next year's budget," Kerr said. "That's big. That's big for us."

  • Dead letter office?

    In its 90-year-old building, with its decades-old post office boxes and old-fashioned metal-barred service window, a visit to the Lando Post Office is like visiting a piece of American history. Unfortunately, if a federal plan to close post offices in a budget-tightening move comes to pass, the Lando Post office and zip code will be history.

  • Fort Lawn senior's program blossoms with fellowship

  • Filing for city council race ends, Clack will seek second term

    The filing deadline for the May Chester City Council election has come and gone and one surprise name was added to the list just before the Saturday deadline.
    Alan Clack, the Ward I incumbent who had previously said he would not seek a second term, has filed for re-election. He will be opposed by former candidate William "Budda" Killian.

  • Winters files for Ward IV council seat

    A former candidate for Chester City Council has filed to run in this May's municipal election.
    Christopher Winters filed the necessary paperwork on Thursday to seek the Ward IV seat being vacated by two-term incumbent Susan Kelsey. There are now three announced candidates for the seat, with former councilman King Thompson and former political candidate Ike McBrayer both having previously filed.

  • Filing for city election rolls on

    No new names have been added to the list of those running for city council or mayor since late last week.
    Fred David Sharrai filed to run for the council seat in Ward II last week. He is the only addition since the initial flurry of filings last Tuesday. Sharrai will face incumbent Betty Bagley, who has filed to seek another term.

  • Filing continues for city races

    Filing continues for the City of Chester's Municipal Election.
    According to Earl Moore, director of the Chester County Registration and Elections Office, Fred David Sharrai filed to run for the council seat in Ward II. He is the only addition since the initial flurry of filings on Tuesday. Sharrai will face incumbent Betty Bagley, who has filed to seek another term.

  • Industrial, mobile home permits up, others down

    Building permits for mobile home and industries rose in Chester County in 2010, but the number issued for single-family and commercial projects dropped sharply.
    According to a release from the Catawba Regional Council of Governments, building permit activity in the county was mixed last year. The number of single family permits went from 35 in 2009, down to 20. The numbers were either unchanged or up in the region's other counties, as Lancaster jumped from 494 to 564, Union stayed at 18 and York went from 922 to 1,001.

  • Filing opens for city races

    William "Budda" Killian thinks the third time will be the charm.
    Killian informed the News & Reporter that he plans to seek the Ward I council seat being vacated by Alan Clack. Killian has sought a seat on the council twice before, he said, narrowly losing to Councilwoman Susan Kovas two years ago.
    "I feel like the time is now. It's now or never," Killian said.

  • City hall to get facelift

    Chester City Hall will finally be getting part of it's long-discussed facelift.
    At a recent meeting of Chester City Council, Randy Ransom, of J.M. Cope Construction, updated the council on work that needs to be done. Previously, problems with bricks loosening and falling have been discussed. Ransom focused on the roof, providing the council with hundreds of pictures of the problems.
    "Some parts of the roof are no longer water-tight," Ransom said.