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Government

  • County not responsible for roads, Roddey says

    Chester County Supervisor Carlisle Roddey has a message for the people calling to complain about the road conditions during last week's ice storm.
    "We're not responsible for the roads," Roddey said.
    Roddey said he has received a number of calls about the roads, some polite and some not so much. He said he understands the frustration that people feel, but said the scraping and de-icing duties fall on the state. The county simply does not have the equipment or manpower to do such a large-scale job, Roddey said.

  • Weather scraps city council meeting

    At least until February, Chester City Council is going back to its once-a-month meeting schedule, but not by choice.

  • Moore won't seek second term with state association

    Chester's Earl Moore will not seek a second term as director of the South Carolina Association of Registration and Election Officials.
    Moore, who serves as the director of the Chester Registration and Election Office, said he has decided to spend more time on local issues.
    "I decided to focus on local issues effecting voters of Chester County," Moore said. "That includes increasing voter registration and educating young people on the importance of voting."

  • Pressley retires as Register of Deeds Deputy

    Joyce Pressley, the register of deeds deputy for Chester County officially retired on Friday.
    Dozens of well-wishers were on hand to celebrate her last day of employment with the county.
    Pressley has worked in the Chester County Clerk of Court's Office for 23 years, she said.
    “I just enjoyed recording documents for people and meeting people,” Pressley said. “I enjoyed the general public and that's what I'm going to miss.”

  • Council member grateful for Darby Road upgrade

    It's never too late to say, “thank you!,” a county official said.
    Councilwoman Mary Guy says she is ever grateful for the attention that was given to complete a major water problem on Darby Road.
    The initial call to inform Guy of the problem came in 2006 when Darby Road resident, Elouise McCree, made a complaint of the terrible well water conditions in that area, Guy said.
    Guy said McCree also attended a Chester County Council meeting and addressed council members to make them aware of the problems in her area.

  • Fort Lawn swears in new mayor

    Fort Lawn Town Council began with a brief swearing in ceremony for the new mayor and two returning council members Tuesday. Mayor John Rumford and councilmen Scott Russell and Carlton Martin were sworn in by Town Attorney Brian Grier prior to the business session. Rumford was accompanied by his wife, Sara, and Russell by his wife, Laura, as they took the oath of office. Rumford says as he begins his new duties, he's simply trying to “feel his way.”

  • Mulvaney takes oath of office

    WASHINGTON, D.C. – With his right hand raised, and standing next to his three children on the floor of the U.S. House of Representatives, Mick Mulvaney took the congressional oath of office Wednesday afternoon.
    After a morning of celebrating with family, friends and constituents, Mulvaney joined 96 other freshman House delegates to become a member of the country’s 112th Congress. The oath was taken only minutes after Mulvaney cast his vote for the newest Speaker of the House, Rep. John Boehner, a Republican from Ohio.  

  • "Liars"

    No one attended the 7 p.m. Public Hearing to address the Richburg Town Council meeting regarding changing the town's election from June to November but things heated up at the council meeting that followed. Mayor James Harris opened the session for the public hearing on Wednesday to hear comments but being that no one was there to speak, he officially closed the session. The council then waited until 7:30 p.m. for their regularly scheduled monthly meeting.

  • Roddey says property lease agreement "a good deal"

  • Mulvaney has his eyes opened

    His 10-point victory over 28-year District 5 incumbent John Spratt opened a lot of eyes last month. Republican Mick Mulvaney had his eyes opened during his recent trip to Washington D.C. for a freshman orientation.
    "They taught us what to do in case of a terrorist attack, how to use a chemical mask," said Mulvaney.
    A number of things having nothing to do with politics, including security measures he needs to take in his own home, were discussed.